Digital Marketing Expert Roman Prokopchuk ~ Episode #18

(Last Updated On: May 11, 2021)

Special guest Roman Prokopchuk talks about Digital Marketing, SEO,  content creation and more.

Take Your Digital Marketing Efforts to the Next Level ~ Episode #18 Roman Prokopchuk

 

ABOUT Roman Prokopchuk

Roman is a 1st generation immigrant from Ukraine. He arrived in the US with six other family members in a two bedroom apartment. Roman interned with the Secret Service and held a top-secret government clearance. He was forced to become a self-taught digital marketer due to the 2008 recession and fell in love with it.

Roman has 11 years of experience leading digital teams in senior leadership roles on over 600 campaigns across many industries. He founded Nova Zora Digital in 2012.

Roman is the Digital Savage Experience Podcast host, a Top 100 Podcast on Apple Podcasts for How To. He is a foster parent and has had 25 kids in his home since June 2018. He became a foster parent by going through 5 miscarriages with his wife in 3 years, 2 of which happened on Christmas Days. With death, loss, and hardships, Roman pushes through no matter what.

Source: Digital Savage – Leveling Up in Life – The DJ DORAN SHOW.

Roman Prokopchuk ONLINE PRESENCE

Website: novazoradigital.com

Podcast: Roman Prokopchuk's Digital Savage Experience

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EPISODE #18 PODCAST TRANSCRIPT

My Beautiful Wife
Thank you for listening to the Freddy “O” Show, a podcast devoted to you, the listener, your purpose, mindset, and your marketing efforts designed to help you go to that next level. Now here's your host, Freddie O.

Freddy Owen
Super excited to bring Roman Prokopchuk on board today. Roman, welcome to the Freddy “O” Show.

Roman Prokopchuk
Thank you for having me on. I really appreciate it.

Freddy Owen
So let's get this party started. Who is Roman? And what makes you tick? Yep. So

Roman Prokopchuk
I am a first-generation immigrant from Ukraine who came over when I was five with 600 other family members in 1990; Ukraine was still under the Soviet Union. I went to school here, went to Rutgers University for criminal justice intern with the Secret Service thought I was going that route. But then I graduated, like literally a month before that 2008 recession hit. So the state, local federal agencies froze hiring. And I, basically out of necessity, stumbled into digital marketing. And mainly, the pillar of introducing me to the industry was SEO through a gym encounter with somebody, you know, striking up a conversation. And they basically said, come out to my car; I want to give you something after your workout, which obviously could have gone several ways. And I did that. And they opened up their trunk, handed me a packet about search engine optimization, and basically said, read this, you know, go online, read up on it, and you can do it for my business. And that was you know, going on 13 years, I've held several director roles on the agency side manage seven-figure portfolios, fortune 500 clients, and in 2012, I founded my own agency. And at that time, back in the day, I saw the evolution of the internet. So I knew search engine optimization was one component, but really how content strategy how online reputation management, and local search if it's brick and mortar, and paid search and other things tie into it as well.

Freddy Owen
Awesome. So you have a dog, and I actually have three dogs. What kind of dog do

Roman Prokopchuk
, yeah, they're usually quiet. But that's okay. No, no, you.

Freddy Owen
know what we're really here on the radio show. We have dogs. We sometimes have we have kids. So that run around, and it's all good because that's who we are. We're real. But no, that's awesome. So when you talk about, we're gonna dive into SEO in a second SEO. But let's talk about you personally. When did you first discover that you obviously wanted to be an entrepreneur? Have you always had not been an entrepreneur at heart? Or, as you said, you're going to go into the Secret Service? You said, right.

Roman Prokopchuk
Yep. So I mean, I think coming from like an Eastern European background, from a former communist country, if you see a lot of unicorn companies, big tech companies, and so on and so forth. A lot of the founders are from Eastern Europe. So I believe like, there's a certain grit from somebody who comes to the United States, from that kind of experience of, you know, the area they came from. Whether it's communism, you know, war, famine, relief, religious persecution, whatever reason that you come over here. So I think one of those things like back in the day, I would, you know, flip candy in school, which I guess I got detention at some point for having a mom go to like, Costco or Sam's Club, or BJs get me a thing of candy. For whatever unit price was maybe 25 cents I would sell at $1 apiece, and little ventures like that, in terms of like making money. So I think at heart, I was always driven to kind of Excel and really be outside of the box, and really kind of drive my own destiny. Yeah,

Freddy Owen
my dad was an entrepreneur. And it's definitely I agree with you. Because as I was the same way, back in the day, you find little things, start selling them, and go to eBay and sell on eBay. And then it's just that good feeling of Wow, I can actually turn a profit on, you know, doing what I it's something I actually enjoy doing. So did you run any roadblocks when you first started to, you know, going from the Secret Service, switching gears, and starting in the digital online world? Did you run into any roadblocks that you were like, wow, that was just like, I almost gave up, but I didn't.

Roman Prokopchuk
Yeah, I mean, I guess the first experience I had so working for that person, which I won't; I think I've only shared the story on like three or four interviews. So basically, they were going to compensate me for my time there and doing that work, but the person's cat got cancer, and he dropped $20,000 on the cat. So the compensation that I was, you know, supposed to receive for that initial digital marketing project and working with you know, his company for a few months, and never came. Still, that foot in the door and that experience was far more valuable than those few $1,000 maybe not at the time because obviously, I was angry about it. Still, it was also a business lesson, like doing business not only on the handshake, and just because you're friends, doesn't mean that necessarily carries over into business relationships and lessons like that. So I think that was the starting point. And, you know, a week or two after that, I got picked up as a contractor by a company called LexisNexis, which then I brought on, got brought on full time in the legal industry, where I worked with small and medium and large-sized law firms all over the country eventually had their elite portfolios, clients that spent $100,000 a year or more. And that was kind of learning under pressure. Yes, initially, there were challenges in those roles, but I think knowledge far kind of transcends kind of learning. So if you read something from a book, it's one thing; if you have real-world experience, it's another. I've talked about this a few times in terms of going in and talking to digital marketing students in a university like the College of New Jersey in New Jersey. And they were kind of clueless about, like, what the industry is, how it is, the relationships, how it functions. So people think, okay, we jump into it, and you're going to be a digital nomad, or you're going to make six figures starting out and propel your career that doesn't necessarily actually work like that. And you really have to kind of be in the trenches and make your own path.

Freddy Owen
Yeah, you gotta get you gotta dig deep sometimes. And you have to go through the mud. And I think every entrepreneur that has stuck with it has gone through the mud. I went through the mud. You went through the mud, and it's sometimes it's not fun. But I have to. I had a question on my head that popped in, and then that popped out, and I popped back in. So you live in America now? Correct?

Roman Prokopchuk
Yep, I'm in New Jersey. Okay, New Jersey.

Freddy Owen
How well Do we have it over here compared to Ukraine?

Roman Prokopchuk
Yeah, this is like, I don't want to be insulting. But this is like soft, even obviously, with the whole lockdown and his whole pandemic, yes, people have experienced getting the disease, their loved ones getting it and passing away or getting really sick. Those situations are crazy, but the whole lockdown component minus the minimal social interaction like you. If this was 20 years ago, I think like the suicide rate would be so much higher mental health would be a lot more kind of profound on the communication opportunities we have. I mean, in Ukraine, in the east, there's still a stalemate, there's, there's kind of an open conflict with basically Russia. Other situations happened in Ukraine over time that Ukraine kind of got screwed over in one way or another. And it's just like you develop kind of that grit. So like coming here, and you have that in the back of your mind, you know, where you came from, from, you know, a Soviet-controlled country with KGB, religious persecution, people that actually spoke up disappeared to Siberia to work camps and stuff like that, standing in the breadline. There are many more harsh things in the world that people aren't aware of because they're not necessarily exposed to.

Freddy Owen
And Americans get Max, you have to stay at six feet apart and put a mask on. Interesting. That's just crazy. It is true. Because we don't know what it's like we are. We don't realize what we have in America. So that's I just wanted to get your perspective. And I think that's a fantastic perspective. So let's jump into the topic. A lot of marketers struggle with SEO. What do you see marketers doing that is hurting their SEO rankings?

Roman Prokopchuk
Ah, well, marketers and companies thinking that it's some kind of like, there's some kind of magic bullet to bypass all the hard work and building the actual strategy overtime to get you to a certain place, and then it's like, you know, set it. I think a lot of people think it's like a set and forget it. Especially clients when they're like, Alright, well, you got us for, you know, our desired goal in terms of the themes, topics, terms, we're generating traffic through equating to sales or leads, you know, we're done right? Well, that's not actually how it works. Like it's an ongoing process, if done, right, there's a lot of work and a lot of moving pieces if you focus on all the SEO components, so the on-site, the technical aspect, and the off-site. So I mean, on-site, yes refreshes, things of that nature, metadata, and other things, the content strategy itself, internal linking things of that nature. But then you have link acquisition and link building and relationship building that obviously creates a value in terms of boosting the site's authority. Suppose it's a, you know, five. In that case, if you get a follow link back, you get direct SEO juice or nofollow, which I still, you know, recommend because you have the opportunity for referral traffic, and a lot of that is time-consuming. Like there are PR components. There's, you know, social media components have done right to benefit SEO. So there's so many moving parts and so many things within the ecosystem that didn't exist in 2008 when it was kind of like the Wild West when I got into it, where people were like just doing it to a piece search engines, and I think people are still doing Two-piece search engines and some situation when you're really needing to give the best value and the best experience for the end-user that lands on your website.

Freddy Owen
So it's gotten a lot harder, obviously,

Roman Prokopchuk
yeah, and content changed over time as well. So just because you're writing, you know, making sure you have keywords in the content, the focus changed. Now, Google and other search engines have an AI component; it's more personalized, more localized. So things back in the day where if you look for something, you know, random mate. Let's say, Nike sneakers, you would get what whoever is ranking technically, nationally, or sometimes, globally, obviously, country to country, the primary in terms of top search engine differs. But now you added a personalization component, you added a local component more so improvement in local. So if you look for that, specifically, you're probably going to get your closest, you know, shoe outlets, things of that nature, local sites, different informational content. So it's important in terms of your strategy, incorporating the intent, so navigational, transactional, informational, and casting a wider net and adding value, because if you're still doing stuff like keyword stuffing, or creating like a crapload of content, just to cover all the themes that you think are showing. you know, your ranking for you want to show up for, if it's not delivering value, your longevity on the first page, even if you get there will be minimal because Google wants to show the best experience on page one. So if you're doing that, and you get to page one, eventually, if you're not giving anything of value through your content, one, it's 2021, you can get that elsewhere. But when people get to that page, they're not going to interact with that content or go to other content on your site. So the bounce rate is going to be extremely high. So the higher the bounce rate, Google's not going to want to show a page with something closer to, you know, 100% bounce rate because that correlates with people not getting the information they need. And they want to give the best search experience to a user, especially on the first page of the search engine results page.

Freddy Owen
So okay, now, you know, you always hear people talk about the amount of text in an article. So video videos, very powerful people love video, they go to a website to watch the video, would you say like putting a video with a brief synopsis of what that video is about? Would that rank better than just a full long term article?

Roman Prokopchuk
I don't necessarily think so. Obviously, I think you should have some kind of element that may highlight the transcript of the actual, you know, content and meat and bones of that video through some kind of elements like a drop-down or a flyout. So it's not like overbearing on the site but creating a holistic experience for end-users. So whether that be content imagery, if you want to put a soundbite, if you want to put a video, whatever tells that story, and has somebody spend a long time on that site. I mean, ultimately, you know, the text is text; if Google can see it as text can crawl, it can see it, it's related to whatever that landing page is, or whatever the type of page you're utilizing. Suppose it's a, you know, geo-specific page or something about your business or area of practice. In that case, that's going to obviously be a better experience and ultimately favor you in terms of ranking.

Freddy Owen
Okay, so I want to switch gears because SEO, you could talk about SEO for hours, upon hours, everybody has different strategies, but you know, it's there's a lot that goes into it. I, by far, still, if when I look back, if I would have kept on putting out good content value from that point when I first started to now, I think it would be much different. I'd be obviously in a better situation. As far as my blog-wise, I know because one thing is I'm not a big writer. So that's for me, that's a little bit tough. But I can see that Google wants you to have, you know, good content out there and answering good questions, and backlinking. And it's a time SEO is a time thing. It just takes time to reap the benefits.

Roman Prokopchuk
Correct? Yeah. And it's not an on and off switch. Obviously, you have a budget for maybe media buys, paid search, paid social, any other paid-for any sponsorship or syndication deals, things of that nature, and PR activities. Well, if you run out of the budget that you know, the source of traffic disappears. With SEO, if you build it and nurture it. It's a constant stream of traffic, you know, month over month, year over year. Not many things will change where you appear in search engines other than what you do to your site, what your competitors do their site, algorithm changes, or search trends changing. So like if you're targeting, if you have something seasonal and let's say that Product Category disappears, well, you're kind of screwed, because there's not going to be any more traffic, those four things impact where you show up in search engines. And if you're not doing anything, and you're stagnant. Obviously, you have competitors. And eventually, they're doing SEO. They're putting content out in terms of a content strategy that's driven by, you know, users and focusing in terms of optimization. And eventually, regardless, if you're number one, if you stop doing, you know, things in terms of efforts on your campaign, they will overtake you over time.

Freddy Owen
Okay, so let's go to this. So starting out as digital marketing can be extremely overwhelming for marketers, especially when they're starting out with so many moving parts, etc., shiny object syndrome. Give me three things that you would have someone that is the brand new focus on primarily.

Roman Prokopchuk
for SEO specifically, no, no, for their overall business, like the marketing or just in general,

Freddy Owen
in general. For me, personally, I would say, if, you know, SEO is definitely important. But I would focus on A, B and C, like, for instance, paid traffic, if they have a product, making sure they get paid traffic towards it. Because if you do, if you have a product, and you don't send paid traffic to it, and you try to do just SEO, you're gonna be waiting a good long time, in most cases, correct?

Roman Prokopchuk
Yeah, you need to supplement it. So it's not like, you know, I go to a client, and you just have to do SEO. Right now, it's more of an integrated approach where it's like, you're not necessarily doing everything, and let's throw it against the wall. But understanding where your target audience spends most of their time or how you can reach them in doing so either through, you know, free or paid methods built on your core website. And eventually, through all those efforts, you're driving traffic back to your website, which then the website is optimized. And hopefully, your SEO strategy leads to, you know, top-performing in terms of creating traffic that generates, you know, users and sales over time.

Freddy Owen
Yeah, it's, as far as digital marketing. When I first started out, I was really focused on trying to, quote, be the SEO monster, oh, I'm gonna figure this out. There's really no figuring it, figuring it out. In most cases, correct? It's or do you disagree with that?

Roman Prokopchuk
I mean, there's not yes and no. So like, there are around two to 300 ranking factors in terms of what influences or impacts your position or performance within an organic search. And a lot of those have been documented in terms of signals. And you can go through those and audit your site and see if you're doing something well or poorly and adapt to that, but certain things in terms of penalties, why a specific site gets penalized over another site. Obviously, there are algorithm refreshes and updates and things of that nature. And now a few years ago, rank brain, which is the AI component, you know, you can't necessarily, basically create a strategy that like, capitalizes or combats, they're the AI component of their search engine, because the AI is trying to learn what information you're looking for to deliver the best personal experience. So it's more about personalization. Now, that makes SEO a little harder because, you know, search engines are trying to appease each individual user and not like a group or a community in that sense.

Freddy Owen
Yeah, and don't get me wrong. I am, I am working on my site right now. But it's not my prime focus because here's the deal. If you're a marketer, you know, and you're starting out, and you put all your money just towards paid advertising. Eventually, that is going to all your time and money towards this paid advertising. You're not really focusing on building some type of an SEO strategy for your business. Once that money runs out. What do you have? At least if you do both, I think that you're going to be in a much better situation, especially with paid advertising, you know, you got to do like, because paid advertising you have to do split testing, try different ads, some cause some don't work. Some do work with SEO if you think it's a good balance, I guess to say balance. So for you personally, what do you focus on? As far as balancing the three things that you focus on in your like week, throughout your regular daily week, like what do you focus on in your business?

Roman Prokopchuk
And I mean, top-level in terms of strategy, creative creation, and tactical planning, because I am involved heavily in that checking and people management specifically, and then kind of knowledge sharing, it's you know, we talked about Clubhouse and things of that nature, too. Jumping in and really sharing what I know or what I've experienced. And not necessarily like what I've read in the book. But what I've actually seen with clients, or I've had numerous clients in the specific industry, how did that, you know, work? How can it evolve, strategies and tactics we've developed, so more. So sharing knowledge or being open with that in terms of positioning myself and my company as thought leaders and providing value in that way, personally direct people management, and then actually being involved, and strategy and tactical planning.

Freddy Owen
Okay, so we'll switch gears a little bit. And I'm going to ask you two questions, though. So first, because you see, you've seen a lot of things happening online, what is the most overrated marketing Avenue you see people using in your, in your eyes, most overrated?

Roman Prokopchuk
I mean, I would say, I would say certain social things where it's like, just to be on a platform for the sake of being on the platform. And just, I'm not dissuading people from having if their target audience isn't, you know, let's say on Twitter, not to be on Twitter, but not push it to a certain extent where you know, something is in a proposal or a contract, just simply to like, buffer up what you're getting paid as an agency. So something like that, like content creation, content creation, for example. So ideally, you want a unique content experience on each social channel. Obviously, dimensions for images, video dimensions, things of that nature are different. And the way that people interact with content is different. Now, that's very time-consuming. Now, some people push, you know, you should be on all three, four, or five major platforms, and we're gonna have a social media calendar and create content in terms of a cadence, you know, two to four posts, well, you're just inflating the price of the actual campaign, that doesn't mean that that's something that you need, I mean, my strategy, like, if you're looking at social, have a core, you know, platform, so if you're a b2b, majority of your efforts should be on LinkedIn, but I'm not dissuading you from putting at least a brand presence, because SEO is also, you know, overlap overall online visibility and branding, you have branded keywords and non branded keywords. So what I was saying it's, it's a different ecosystem. Now, all those components are tied into the kind of like, who you are and where you're going. And like you said, if you're putting money just into paid, that's fine. Some people, you know, what white label products and push to Amazon or push to their e-commerce site and don't want to build a brand. But if you're creating products, and you want to build a brand, that SEO strategy, also, you know, entails branding that will get brand visibility over time. And now, people can actually get some kind of value to add and have a social proof and develop trust for your brand. And then, hopefully, obviously, buy your products.

Freddy Owen
I agree, especially spreading yourself too thin and trying to do every platform I've done in the past. I do not do that anymore. The most underrated marketing strategy that people don't use, and they should be using.

Roman Prokopchuk
I would say short-form content creation on and testing on platforms that you know, normally wouldn't be on. So I knocked Tick Tock for a while because I couldn't necessarily implement it for clients or myself. And then let me try it because it has the stereotype of its young kids, you know, lip-synching or doing dances. Still, there's a lot of content creators in specific industries now. So one of my videos, I'm not gonna say, went viral per se, but it took me 60 seconds to do; you know, we got like 120,000 views, it took me another 60 seconds to edit. To two minutes of my time equated to, I think the watch time for that was like 100 hours of that one minute clip being watched. And if I didn't do it, I didn't test it. I would never get that additional visibility. And what was the well, real quick, what

Freddy Owen
is your Tick Tock handle everything. And

Roman Prokopchuk
that's another key, like, Don't make crazy names or variations of your brand or personal name differently on each platform. So like, I have everything uniform. So it's my first and last name. If you Google that, all of my social platforms will come up in search.

Freddy Owen
Okay. So and you had 120,000 views?

Roman Prokopchuk
Yeah, it was like 6000 likes for I mean, that's one platform, or like, organic reach still isn't kept. So yeah, they did monetize it, but you have the opportunity to go viral on Tick Tock more so than any other platform. So like for Tick tock, that's, that's great. But like some people put something random on, or something that's thought-provoking or has like an emotional trigger. I'll get 123 4 million, you know, views and then you know, I think equated to the 120,000 views. I think it was about six to 7000 likes. Then I believe like 700,000 moments that I've personally gone through and responded to, just to keep the conversation going. So like the metrics are there just like it, can you implement it? Or is it nice? I mean, it's great for visibility. Did it actually lead to business? No. But it actually led to other opportunities. People saw that video; I actually had a PR opportunity where a magazine saw that video now that had the opportunity for a 15-minute phone interview that then they turned into an article. So there's the indirect value of doing things like that as well.

Freddy Owen
I've got to watch that video. At Roman pro cup, Chuck, is your Twitter handle, Twitter, tick-tock handle, and okay. So, do you use Twitter,

Roman Prokopchuk
I am on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn, Instagram, tik tok, Clubhouse, and probably something, YouTube, and anything else, I believe anything that comes out, I try to get on there be an early adapter, reverse engineer what's going on how people engage with the platform, what the current demographic is, how I can utilize it for myself, my brand clients to really deliver value and not just be on it. And let's hope we you know, we have some kind of thing where we're like influencers on the platform and start like, going viral. It's more like how I can add value and deliver the type of content people were looking for and consuming on that platform?

Freddy Owen
So you'd like to dig deep into that stuff?

Roman Prokopchuk
Yeah, I have a whole content strategy for Clubhouse after being on it for a week. So it's like, there's so much potential, but it's like seeing what people are doing in that week. And then like thoughtfully talking about it. And then, like, you know, we talked about the format of Clubhouse and then going in rooms where the conversation isn't just to kind of inflate your ego and have people see you on stage or a moderator, but actually have thought provoking conversations that bounce ideas off each other. If you don't agree with something, obviously share your viewpoint. But people are looking at things from different perspectives. So having a lot of people looking at the same problem, you can create a more effective path to a solution.

Freddy Owen
I love it. I like you're very intricate when it comes to this stuff. Not as intricate. I'm not nearly as intricate when it comes to that stuff I got on the Clubhouse, and I thought it was brilliant. And I honestly think the sound quality's amazing on that too. So definitely, if you guys don't have Clubhouse, check it out and check out Romans Clubhouse as well. So make sure you guys check out the show notes on fred.com you'll be able to connect with Roman; his website Nova Zora digital.com will be on there as well. You can ask any type of digital marketing questions. And also, make sure you tune into the digital savage experience podcast. Did I say that correctly? Correct. Nora's or digital? Correct. Awesome. So now we're gonna jump into the super high, super hyper fast q&a round. So are you ready for these questions? These questions have nothing to do with SEO or marketing. So let's see if you're ready. Okay. Yeah, let's

Roman Prokopchuk
does it. Okay, so

Freddy Owen
what animal would be the cutest if scaled down to the size of a hamster?

Roman Prokopchuk
I would say a lion.

Freddy Owen
That would, I would say so. Yeah. Hello, kitty cat. Would what weird food combinations Do you really enjoy?

Roman Prokopchuk
I don't even know I like my wife hates it, but from like an Eastern European background. I like pickled herring. It's kind of salty. Sometimes it's in like a, like a creamy mixture. But it's one of those things where it's like I grew up with it and like I'm accustomed to it. Or any like salted fish, as you know, that's really preserved. I think maybe it's an Eastern European thing.

Freddy Owen
So like, Oh my gosh, anchovies.

Roman Prokopchuk
Anchovies are weird because anchovies are not one of those things that Eastern Europe has; I think that's more of a Western Europe thing. You see in like Greek Italy, a Greece, Italy and, you know, Croatia in the Balkans. Like, macro and different other fish like bigger fish, like you know, a white fish. Okay, okay.

Freddy Owen
What movie Can you watch over and over without getting tired of

Roman Prokopchuk
that? I mean, there are so many, but I just stopped watching. Let me see a good one. Braveheart.

Freddy Owen
Okay, fantastic movie. What is your cure for hiccups?

Roman Prokopchuk
They just go away. I don't like to address them. You know what I mean? I mean, back in the day, the whole thing was like, somebody needs to scare like, scare them out of you. But I don't know. I mean, like a glass of water. Maybe I haven't gotten hiccups in a while, to think of it.

Freddy Owen
I haven't either. If someone narrates your life, who would you want that? Who would you want to be the narrator?

Roman Prokopchuk
James Earl Jones.

Freddy Owen
Awesome. Okay, so one last final thought. One last shout out to the radio show fan that you can feel could impact them today.

Roman Prokopchuk
Whatever you're doing in digital marketing or in life or in business, try it now. And don't wait until tomorrow because if you're in digital marketing, if you wait, usually if you're an early adapter, you have the highest traffic or traction. And then you know, coupled with traffic and actually the desired goals you're looking for, if you wait on things and hope to test something, and wait and wait on it, it may not be applicable, as you know, a strategy in the future. And if you're looking to start a digital marketing agency or any business, like now is the perfect time regardless of the current climate, if you lost your job, or you were furloughed or laid off if you have something that's a passion, maybe or something that you've always had as a side hustle, go in on that if you're good at that, you know, make connections network, and really kind of hone your craft.

Freddy Owen
Don't procrastinate. Just do it. Roman, you're a rock star, man. I really appreciate you being on the radio show today.

Roman Prokopchuk
Thank you for having me on. I had fun

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